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 Nova Scotia Minerals: Chalcopyritespacer

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CHALCOPYRITE

CuFeS2
Copper Iron Sulfide


Copper Lake Cu, Fe, Au Mine (Polsons Lake), Antigonish County
UTM (NAD27)
Zone 20
 Northing 5028375
 Easting 579915
Details:
 Drive north from the village of Goshen for 3 km to Copper Lake. From an intersection at this point, drive northeast along a road that follows the shore of the lake for another 0.8 km to a small bridge over a stream, which flows into the eastern end of the lake. Walk southeast along a farm laneway across a farmers field which begins about 30 m west of the bridge. The prospect is located in the woods adjacent to the field 200 m southeast of the road that follows the lake shore (Ervine, 1994)
References:
 NSMOD #F05-003
Further Info:
 Copper was first noticed in the vicinity of Copper Lake in the 1850's by a Cornishmen whose plans to proceed with a mining operation were thwarted when he, and the ship in which he was sailing to England in order to raise capital, were lost at sea. In 1867 a company was formed to explore the area but operations were suspended without finding a vein. Boulders carrying chalcopyrite and pyrite and a gossan were the only indication of mineralization up to that time. Dr. G. M. Dawson and Sir William Dawson visited the area in 1872, found boulders running 10-13% Cu and predicted a vein should be found nearby. As a result, an Alex McBain discovered the Copper Lake vein in 1875 and formed a company. Another company was also formed by an associate of Mr McBain's, a Mr. A. P. Ross. In 1876 the two companies cooperated in a venture to sink 2 shafts 46 m apart. A feud errupted over property boundaries and operations ceased as court actions proceeded. This situation continued for 20 years until the two companies went bankrupt. At that time the deeper of the 2 shafts had only been sunk 18 m. In 1890 the Copper Crown Company, and later the Lake Copper Mining Company Limited, acquired and mined the property. The latter company developed a total of 244 m of underground workings. In 1908 the main shaft was 41 m deep, with levels at 6, 11 and 30 m. In the years prior to 1908, a total of 325 tonnes of ore averaging about 5% Cu were produced from the deposit. Nearly 100 tonnes of this ore averaging 11.6% Cu were shipped in three lots to Swansea, Wales, Liverpool, England and New Jersey, USA. Another lot of 136 tonnes averaging 3.5% Cu was shipped to Pictou, N.S.. The remaining 91 tonnes of 2% Cu were left on the dump. Between (1908-1910) further underground work consisted of deepening the partly inclined main shaft as well as the air shaft, sinking a new shaft and some crosscutting. It is reported that 1,090 tonnes of ore were on the dump by 1909. Work stopped in 1910 and except for minor work in 1925-27. No record of any further work is known until 1937 when the Mining and Finance Company of Halifax partially dewatered and rehabilitated the workings and carried out a sampling program under the supervision of a Donald F. MacDonald. He reported that the main shaft was in ore to a slope depth of 46 m, where flooding prevented further search. He also reported an air shaft 12 m deep was also in ore and a crosscut extended nearly 61 m into the hanging wall. Another shaft, near the lake, was full of water and said to be 46 m deep, but had not yet reached the vein. Except for some pits and trenches dug in 1948, no further work was reported until 1951, when H. L. Cameron, who had worked on the property in 1937, wrote a summary report concluding that the mine warranted no further development work. However, he did recommend further exploration should be carried out by geophysical methods and diamond drilling. Cameron also reported that the main shaft stopped at a depth of 290 feet. Cameron reported again in 1952 for Northern Mineral Limited that in 1951 the mine was completely dewatered and the lower levels were sampled. Copper values were found to decrease with depth. Bulldozing exposed the vein from the shaft to the schoolhouse, but the eastward extension was not found. It was thought that northeast-trending faults may have displaced the veins. Between 1962 and 1964 Novamine Syndicate, under the direction of Mr. P. Lacombe, carried out magnetometer, resistivity, and self potential surveys and a 24 hole diamond-drilling program totalling 2,377 m. The drilling outlined two parallel sulphide zones. One was 1.8 m thick and was traced for 275 m with the best intersection returning 1.19% Cu, the second was 1.4 m thick and was traced for 30 m with the best intersection returning 2.21% Cu, each over their respective widths. The overall average was 1.38% Cu. In 1969 the property was acquired by the Great Horn Mining Syndicate Incorporated, who carried out geochemical and geophysical (EM, spontaneous potential) surveys as well as follow-up diamond drilling. In 1972 the International Mine Services undertook a geochemical survey.
Other Minerals:
 ankerite, bornite, chalcopyrite pyrite, siderite

Dunbrack Pb, Cu, Zn, Ag Mine, Halifax County
UTM (NAD27)
Zone 20
 Northing 4962571
 Easting 484916
Details:
 The Dunbrack Pb, Cu, Zn, Ag Mine (really only a development prospect by modern mining standards) consists of two shafts found a few kilometers north of the village of Musquodoboit Harbour, Halifax County.
References:
 NSMOD #D14-009
Further Info:
 extensive information & references available in the Mineral Database
Other Minerals:
 galena, tridymite, tourmaline, fluorite, azurite, pyrrhotite, cerussite, ilmenite, djurleite, digenite, sphalerite, pyrite, bornite, chalcocite malachite, meneghinite, pyromorphite

Meat Cove Zn Deposit, Inverness County
UTM (NAD27)
Zone 20
 Northing 5208730 / 5208360 / 5208160
 Easting 682840 / 683150 / 683150
Details:

 The Mine Road leads south from the Meat Cove-Lowland Cove Road, approximately 3.2 km west of the village of Meat Cove (200 m west of the juncture of the road with French Brook). The Northwest Zone is exposed along a brook valley, a short distance west of the Mine Road, approximately 600 m south of the juncture of the Mine Road with the Meat Cove-Lowland Cove Road. Coordinates 2: Adit Zone The adit is located along the Mine Road, approximately 500 m southeast of the Northwest Zone. It was driven on a steep east dipping slope, along the south side of a tributary of French Brook. The discovery outcrop is located along this tributary, approximately 70 m northeast of the adit portal. Coordinates 3: South Trench Zone Two large trenches are found on top of the hill, approximately 200-300 m south of the Adit Portal.

References:
  NSMOD #N02-002
Further Info:

 The Meat Cove Deposit is primarily a Zn deposit in which sphalerite is the dominant sulphide mineral. The sphalerite occurs as coarse grained massive crystalline aggregates, as disseminations, as bands and as veins. Chatterjee (1979) reported that sphalerite commonly replaces brucite, antigorite and pyrite. He also noted that the most significant Zn-mineralization occurs as a replacement of forsterite bearing units within the magnesian alteration zone. Other minerals reported to occur within the deposit include pyrite, pyrrhotite, chalcopyrite, galena, graphite, fluorite, arsenopyrite, stannite, germanite and renierite. Pyrite, which is the second most common sulphide mineral, occurs as independent crystals and aggregate masses.

Other Minerals:
 sphalerite, fluorite, arsenopyrite, marcasite, stannite, braunite, pyrite, pyrrhotite, germanite, renierite, galena, graphite

 

M.e.x. Uranium Showing, Hants County
UTM (NAD27)
Zone 20
 Northing 4964040
 Easting 425770
Details:

 The prospect is located in 2, side-by-side gravel pits found along a lumber road, approximately 500 m north of Christie Lake. Christie Lake is approximately 30 km northeast of Halifax and is immediately west of Big Indian Lake.

References:
 NSMOD #D13-026
Further Info:

 The type and style of mineralization is similar to that at the Millet Brook Uranium Deposit, Hants County, Nova Scotia.
Finely disseminated U-bearing phosphates (torbernite and autunite), chalcopyrite and pyrite are associated with an extensively hematized northeast-trending, shear zone. The uraniferous zone extends for approximately 100 m along the shear.
Rock types exposed in the gravel pit encompass all phases of the Big Indian Polyphase Intrusive Suite. The wall rocks exhibit intense hydrothermal alteration, including high-alumina hydrothermal alteration as reflected by the presence of andalusite, cordierite, sillimanite, spinel, garnet, muscovite, biotite and tourmaline.

Other Minerals:
 autunite, pyrite, torbernite, sillmanite, andalusite




 

 Cleavage: poor in one direction

 Colour: brassy yellow, tarnishing to irredescent blue, green, yellow or purple

 Fracture: conchoidal and brittle

 Hardness: 3.5-4

 Luster: metallic

 Streak: dark green

 Possible Useage: copper ore

 More Info: Mineral Gallery, Mineralogy Database

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